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Evaluating Sources - CRAAP Test

Some tips on how to evaluate sources.

Webpage Relevance

Questions to ask when evaluating Relevance in websites:

1. Is the information on the website relevant and useful to your topic?    

2. Does the website answer all, or just some, of the questions you have about your topic?

3. What does the website not answer about your topic? Do you still have gaps of information you need to fill?

4. Is the information on the webstie too broad or too narrow for your research?

 

How to find Relevance in websites: 

1. The only real way to decide if the a website is relevant or not to your topic is to read through it.  If it seems to answer the questions you have about your topic, it might be a good source for you to use for your assignment.  

2. REMEMBER: just because the website is relevant to your topic does not make it a good source to use.  

Print Relevance

Questions to ask when evaluating Relevance in print:

1. Does the item answer all, or just some, of your questions about the topic?

2. What questions does the article or book not answer about your topic?  

3. Is this an encyclopedia or something scholarly? 

4. Is the information in the article too broad or too narrow to be helpful in your research?

How to find Relevance in print:

1. If it is an article read the abstract.  The abstract will tell you if the article is going to talk about the topic you are researching.  Sometimes titles can be misleading.  

2. Encyclopedias might be quite relevant for your topic but you should not use encyclopedias for your research. Think of enclyopedias as a great starting point for your reseach.  

3. If the item is too broad or too narrow, you are likely on the correct path but keep refining your search.